Tag Archives: spam

App of the Week – EasilyDo Email

easily doWe all know how difficult managing our email can be. Especially when you have tons of mass emails flooding your inbox, or inboxes. Mass emails are the primary tool of marketers, political parties, charities and many other groups trying to get your attention. There is a word for this, its called spam. That is why EasilyDo Email is the App of the Week.

EasilyDo Email for Apple devices takes the effort out of unsubscribing from mass email messages, or spam, you have no interest in. Just tap the menu icon in the top-left corner of the inbox. Under the ‘Assistant’ option sits a tab for ‘Subscriptions.’ There you will see a list of current email subscriptions. Beside each on you will find an ‘x’ box. Just tap the box and kiss mass email bon voyage.

You have the option of changing your mind with the undo option that appears immediately but quickly disappears a few seconds later. Unsubscribed email appears at the bottom of your subscriptions list, grayed out for reference.

Lets face it, we all get those emails and ask ourselves; where did that come from? Or how did they get my email address? The answer is simple, there is a massive email market that buys and sells email addresses by the millions. No matter how many emails you unsubscribe from there is always another list out there.

Easily Do Email claims to be better at searching for messages than Apple’s default Mail iOS app by searching deeper and faster into your email archive. It also offers an ‘Assistant’ feature that  lets you quickly see a listing of all your travel-related email arranged by the next upcoming travel and followed by email related to previous trips.

EasilyDo Email’s ‘Packages,’ ‘Bills & Receipts,’ and ‘Entertainment’ assistants work in similar manner but not exactly the same. The Entertainment assistant provides notifications for all pending or past events, theater tickets, OpenTable reservations, and more, but it does not segment the alerts into past or future sections.

Email is currently only available for Apple  but does not work on iPad. Hey nobody’s perfect!

LinkedIn Must Pay for Spam

Linkedin-LogoIf you belong to LinkedIn the company may owe you money. A judge has ordered the company to pay its users for spamming email  in boxes.

LinkedIn was the target of a class action lawsuit and has agreed to pay $13 million to users who were spammed by the company’s overzealous email habits. Members of LinkedIn’s “Add Connections” program between September 2011 and October 2014, are eligible for a payout. You can submit a claim on this website. Applicants for compensation can expect to receive about $10.

The suit was filed in California and focused on users of the program who uploaded their personal contacts so LinkedIn can then send out invitation emails suggesting they connect through the service.

Recipient’s of the email who did not respond after a certain amount of time would then be sent additional emails.  

The suit points out that although a user may have given their permission to send out the initial invitation, they didn’t consent to the repeated emails or to the use of their name and image in those emails. According to the lawsuit an average of two additional emails were sent.

The court decided on the judgement based on the lack of clarity in LinkedIn’s terms of service about those follow-up emails. The lack of clarity will cost the Silicon Valley-based firm $13 million.

LinkedIn responded to the decision with a statement that said in part that the court should be clearer “about the fact that we send reminder emails about pending invitations from LinkedIn members, we have made changes to our product and privacy policy.”

The company went on to say , “Ultimately, we decided to resolve this case so that we can put our focus where it matters most: finding additional ways to improve our members’ experiences on LinkedIn. In doing so, we will continue to be guided by our core value – putting our members first.”

For related information about collecting money from class action lawsuits please the AACR report Class Action Lawsuits Issue Free Dollars

Now you know

 

 

How Not to Get Hacked in Six Easy Steps

canstockphoto22219067Getting hacked is so easy that it is almost comical. Black people need to be aware that most hackers take advantage of human kindness, weakness, curiosity and even stupidity to get inside computer networks. Hacking is simple when the victim is willing to give the hacker a helping hand. Understand how easy it is not to get hacked and you’ll feel a lot better and safer online.

Step 1) Don’t take the bait! Phishing is the first simple step to getting hacked. A Verizon Data Breach Investigation Report revealed 23 percent of phishing recipients open malicious messages and 11 percent open attachments. The report showed that it only takes 82 seconds from when a phishing campaign is launched to when people start biting on the phony lures.  One of the the cardinal rules of email security is to not click on any link or download attachment that you are not absolutely certain of what it is and where it came from. If you receive an unexpected email with a link or attachment then call the person who sent it to you if you know who it is. Ask them what they sent you. Avoid any cute pictures, prayers, or jokes. That is how malware gets in your computer along with getting your email on spam lists. If you don’t know who sent it then delete instantly.

Step 2) Don’t fall for the phoney phone call! Much the same as phishing, the simplest way for attackers to gain access to users machines is to just ask for it. The age-old method of social engineering is still reliable.  This is when a hacker talks their victims out of information sometimes without the person even knowing it. On the phone they pretend to be an executive or someone in authority. Sometimes they smooth talk their victim into giving up information using compliments and encouragement. Or they may bully their victim and frighten them into doing or saying something they shouldn’t.

One of the most popular and effective scams is the IT support scam. A caller contacts the victim posing as IT help and asks for the user’s login and password. Sometime they will tell you things like your computer has a virus and it is spreading to your friends and family. Sometimes they may pretend to be a fellow employee or business partner and ask the employee to open a specific document that is actually something like a remote access Trojan or other malware.

Something to think about is that anti-virus software makers do not make outgoing calls to alert an individual that their computer is spreading viruses. Never, ever, share your user name and password with someone on the phone you do not know. Finally, if they claim to be working in the same company with you make damn sure they are who they say they are. Do not open any attachment or click on any link unless you know for sure that it is your company’s IT department you are dealing with. Most companies suffer hacking attacks as a result of employee actions. And most companies will not hesitate to fire you if you violate computer security rules.

Step 3) Stay up to date! Users are often hacked because their systems are not up-to-date and patched for common attacks. Hackers know what software is vulnerable. They look for computers that are using old outdated software to attack. The simplest way to protect yourself is to make sure your software is up to date. Learn to set your computer to perform automatic updates of all software. And stay up to date on the latest scams. According to Verizon hackers are still finding vulnerabilities in computers that are as much as eight years old.

Step 4) Get a strong a password!  Is your password just stupid? An easy to guess user name and password is simply begging to be hacked. Your user name and password is the key to your computer and all the information contained therein. In addition easy to guess user names and passwords also allow access to your bank and other sensitive online activity.  A good strong password is vital. You may even want to switch to two factor authentication if you conduct sensitive business online.

Step 5) Use caution on free WiFi! Researchers with Cylance recently provided solid evidence why you should consider taking an extra security step when utilizing public WiFi connections.The company strongly suggests using VPN on public WiFi networks.  Cylance discovered 277 hotels, convention centers and data centers in 29 countries used routers  with known vulnerabilities to offer WiFi to guests. Public and free hotspots are wide open for starting man-in-the-middle attacks and other means of establishing footholds in unsuspecting users’ machines. Hackers love to hang out in Starbucks, Panera Bread, public libraries and other places that offers free Internet access. They are waiting and watching you log into your bank account.

Step 6) Don’t put your business in the street!  You talk to much! Social media such as Facebook is another favorite hacker hunting ground.  Hackers do their homework.  The information you share on social media sites is exactly what makes a hacker’s jobs easy.   Sharing the name of your pet, your birthday, place of work and special relationship makes it easier for an attacker to guess passwords or the answer to password reset challenge questions.  For example the question “What city were you born in?” is an easy one to answer just by looking at your Facebook page.

This information can be used against you in order to create an extremely effective spear phishing message. Learn to stop sharing so much information on social media. The more you give away the more that can be taken away.

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Newest Social Media Scams

Social media is where a lot of black people hangout online. Its the place to be online. But African-Americans need to understand that social media is the heart of scam country.The newest social media scams are constantly evolving and becoming either more sophisticated or more irresistible. You need to know what the latest scams are and how they work. CSO has published a slide show of the newest social media scams and how they work. After reviewing the list I found that a lot of them are really very typical and play on a person’s greed and desire to get something for nothing. Many work by urging the victim to act quickly. Please remember that if you think you’re gonna get something for nothing its you who may be left with nothing. There is no software that can spot a scam. Why? Because scammers work on the person and their weaknesses and not the technology. So no anti-virus, no anti-malware, no spam blocker is going to protect you. You need to know what to look for and control your desire to get something for nothing.

Now you know.

CSO 10 New Social Media Scams to Watch Out for.

Don’t Bother Unsubscribing from Spam Email!

 

Here is something you probably didn’t know. Unsubscribing from spam email actually ensures that you’re gonna get more!

When it comes to email lists the most valuable emails are those that can be validated. A validated email is an email that the spammer knows is actually in use and monitored. To the spammer this means that the advertising, spam, is being seen by someone and thus reaching an audience. Once you click on unsubscribe and insert your email address you just became a target for even more spam. Visit SpamPrimer.com for more information

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