Tag Archives: Prince Rogers Nelson

Celebrity Cyber Report – Prince

Prince was one of the greatest and most prolific artist of our time. According to some sources the Great Purple One has enough unpublished music to release albums for the next one hundred years.

Prince reportedly has a vault that contains songs, albums and even movies that have never been seen by the public. According to Prince’s sound engineer  David “David Z” Rivkin, “We used to do two songs a day, and he just put them away,” he said. “Maybe he instructed his lawyers to never release them. I hope that’s not the case. I’d like to see some of them come out, a lot of them were pretty great.”

The existence of Prince’s hidden treasure was confirmed by Mobeen Azhar an investigative reporter and filmmaker. Azhar produced a documentary last year entitled  “Hunting for Prince’s Vault.”

Azhar was able to confirm that Prince had produced some powerful music. So powerful that he did not think the public was ready for it.  Among the mysterious recordings is an album by the name of “The Dream Factory.” According to Azhar Prince reportedly felt another song, “The Divine,” had harmonies so intense that “people weren’t ready to hear this song yet.”

But Prince was not just recording his new music. Prince also recorded every concert he ever performed.

As we have written Prince has been reborn in online music streaming. A platform he was never really pleased with and even banned his music from being played there. But on the anniversary of his death a new Prince album is being released online.

Entitled “Deliverance” the six-song album offers music recorded between 2006 and 2008. The title track is currently available on iTunes and Apple Music. Fans can see a short video and hear what is described as Prince’s “unheard spiritual voice.”  According to PrinceRogersNelson.com  the album is only available in the U.S.

Celebrity Cyber Report – It was Prince vs. The Internet

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Prince Rogers Nelson, June 7th 1958-     April 21st, 2016

Prince Rogers Nelson departed our realm on April 21st, 2016. Departed, yes. Dead, never! We lost something more than an artist. We lost the sound, the theme song, of a generation. He was a relentless artist and warrior for freedom of expression, his expression, which so many embraced but could never copy. Prince was unlike any other and to him I say; “Nothing Compares 2 U!”

But the Prince we loved enjoyed was not one we knew very well. That was his choice and his right. Prince was a business man and he understood the music industry and he hated it.

Prince fought an epic battle with his recording company whom he labeled “slave masters.” His anger was so deep that he wrote the word “Slave” on his face and refused to use the name Prince. He became simply, “The Artist.”

And along came the Internet and the fight was on! Prince did not go to war with Warner Bros., and win, to become a slave to the Internet. It was his music, he owned it and he was not about to give it away to anybody.

“I don’t see why I should give my new music to iTunes or anyone else,”  said Prince. “They won’t pay me an advance for it and then they get angry when they can’t get it.”

When it came to his music and the Internet Prince was all business. He once sued 22 fans for $22 million dollars for sharing his music and recordings of his live performances online. The Purple One was not playing around.

Prince’s aggressiveness and penchant for take-down notices earned him a “Lifetime Aggrievement Award” from the Electronic Frontier Foundation for his efforts in “silencing speech.”

But Prince was not the enemy of free speech or technology. Instead he was the protector of his name, his music and his legal ownership of it. He, like many musicians, felt the technology, the Internet in particular, was robbing them of their rightful income and royalties for the music they created. It was the reason that rap mogul Jay-Z founded Tidal music streaming service. Jay-Z re-launched Tidal this year and offers artists a greater slice of the pie for the use of their music. Tidal is only music streaming service that can offer Prince’s music legally.  Prince praised Jay Z for creating Tidal, telling a group of journalists, “We have to show support for artists who are trying to own things for themselves.”

In a 2010 interview Prince boldly declared “the Internet is over!”  But that does not mean he was against technology. His relationship with technology was misunderstood. Prince embraced digital distribution.

Prince set recording industry precedent in 1994 by releasing Interactive, a CD-ROM that contained unreleased music, interviews, a video game, and a virtual tour.  In 1997, Prince released Crystal Ball, a five-CD box set of outtakes and rare cuts exclusively through a website or by calling 1-800-NEW-FUNK. In 2001 Prince unveiled NPG Music Club, a monthly subscription service by which fans could get exclusive Prince content. NPG won Prince a Webby Lifetime Achievement Award in 2006.

Prince was about his music. Many people believed he hated the Internet. That is not completely true. What he hated was the fact that his work, his artistry, was being stolen and the Internet was the tool used to do it. Prince went after bootleggers,  bloggers, YouTube and anyone who dared to use his artwork without fair compensation. It was not a war against technology. It was about getting paid fairly. And he was not alone. There are hundreds of other artists who feel the same and are still fighting to keep their work under their control.

Prince was great beyond music. He understood what technology was doing to musicians and he fought like hell to change things. For himself he won the battle. But the war wages on.

See also – Celebrity Cyber Report, Prince